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Galdi Grades For The Redskins’ Win Over San Francisco

Analysis of the Redskins’ passing game, running game, defense and special teams in the win over the 49ers

 

 

Week 6: The Redskins improved to 3-2 with a 26-24 win over San Francisco at FedEx Field on Sunday afternoon (Oct. 15, 2017)

 

Passing Game: B+

Kirk Cousins played well for a third consecutive game.  He went 25-of-37 for 330 yards, two touchdowns and a pick.  He averaged 8.92 yards per pass attempt.  He was sacked just once.  He registered a Raw QBR of 86.8, which also factors in his fourth-quarter first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead.  He quarterbacked an offense that went 7-for-14 on third downs and 3-for-4 in the red zone.

Also, Kirk authored his ninth game-winning drive since the start of the 2015 season (a game-winning drive, by the way, is an actual stat on Pro Football Reference and is defined as the offensive scoring drive in the fourth quarter or overtime that puts the winning team ahead for the last time).  So think about that.  He has produced a game-winning drive in nine of 37 starts since the start of the 2015 season.  Basically one out of every four games (not four wins), this guy authors a game-winning drive.  Remember that the next time you hear someone say that Kirk isn’t clutch.  I can’t tell you how much I loved Kirk’s third-quarter second-and-10 18-yard shotgun play-action scramble on the drive that resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ fourth-quarter 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead.  That scramble was a quarterback fighting to lead his team to a score off the game having been tied.  Kirk quarterbacked a 16-play 72-yard drive that resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ 21-yard field goal for a 20-17 lead in the fourth quarter.  And Kirk quarterbacked a nine-play 84-yard drive that resulted in his first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead in the fourth quarter.  That’s clutch quarterbacking.

Additionally, I liked a lot of what I saw from Kirk on the Redskins’ fourth offensive drive, which resulted in his second-quarter three-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Samaje Perine off read-option play-action.  Kirk went 6-for-7 for 52 yards and the touchdown on the drive, completing passes to four different pass catchers.

This was a game, though, in which Kirk’s play makers did a lot of the work.  YAC was in effect for the Redskins.

Chris Thompson had four receptions for 105 yards on five targets.  The 100-yard receiving game was Thompson’s second of the season, making him only the second Redskins running back with multiple 100-yard receiving games in a single season in records dating back to 1960 (Dick James, two in 1962).

  • The Redskins’ sixth offensive drive, which resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ late-second-quarter 48-yard field goal for a 17-0 lead, included Thompson making Ray-Ray Armstrong miss on a tackle and generating major YAC on a second-and-22 49-yard reception on a Kirk shotgun screen.  The second play of this drive was a Kirk first-and-10 11-yard under-center checkdown completion to Mack Brown.
  • The Redskins’ ninth offensive drive, which resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ fourth-quarter 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead, included a Kirk shotgun checkdown completion to Thompson for a third-and-12 13-yard reception on which he made linebacker Brock Coyle miss on a tackle on the first play of the fourth quarter.
  • The Redskins’ first offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s first-quarter second-and-five 11-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Josh Doctson, included a Thompson second-and-10 23-yard reception on a Kirk shotgun screen and a Samaje Perine third-and-one 16-yard reception on a under-center play-action-boot screen.
  • The Redskins’ fifth offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s second-quarter third-and-12 shotgun pick to Rashard Robinson, began with a Thompson first-and-10 20-yard reception on a Kirk under-center play-action screen.

Ryan Grant had three receptions for 39 yards on five targets, but all three catches were big.  He already has been targeted more times this season (20) than he was over 16 games last season (19).

  • The Redskins’ 10th offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s fourth-quarter first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead, included Grant coming through with a big third-and-five six-yard reception that ya might say was Pierre Garcon-esque off a Kirk shotgun throw.  Two snaps later was Grant drawing a second-and-11 five-yard holding penalty on K’Waun Williams for a first-and-goal at the 7.
  • The Redskins’ ninth offensive drive, which resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ fourth-quarter 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead, included a Kirk third-quarter third-and-11 18-yard shotgun completion to Grant and a Kirk early-fourth-quarter second-and-11 15-yard shotgun completion to Grant.

Vernon Davis had three receptions for 65 yards on four targets.  He now is averaging 20.5 yards per catch on 11 receptions in this his age-33 season.

  • The Redskins’ 10th offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s fourth-quarter first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead, included a Davis first-and-10 51-yard reception off going vertical down the numbers and then generating massive YAC off a Kirk under-center strike.
  • The Redskins’ ninth offensive drive, which resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ fourth-quarter 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead, included a Kirk early-fourth-quarter second-and-seven eight-yard under-center play-action boot completion to Davis, who frighteningly kept the ball on his inside arm despite having committed a killer lost fumble in the third quarter.

The bad for the Redskins’ passing game in this game:

  • Vernon Davis had a horrendous lost fumble on a first-and-10 seven-yard reception; Kirk Cousins actually saved a touchdown by pushing Jimmie Ward out of bounds at the Redskins’ 1.  But the next play was Carlos Hyde’s third-quarter first-and-goal one-yard I-formation-handoff touchdown run.
  • Redskins’ ninth offensive drive…resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ fourth-quarter 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead…Kirk made inaccurate throws to Chris Thompson on a third-quarter second-and-11 shotgun incompletion and Josh Doctson on a third-quarter first-and-10 pistol incompletion…Doctson did a terrible job of separating against Dontae Johnson on a fourth-quarter third-and-goal-at-the-3 shotgun incompletion.
  • Kirk threw his first pick since the Week 1 loss to Philadelphia in the second quarter of this game, overthrowing Vernon Davis, who didn’t win on his route, on a third-and-12 shotgun deep pick to Rashard Robinson that in essence served as a punt.  The play prior to this was another shotgun overthrow by Kirk for an incompletion that initially was ruled a pick but then overturned via replay.
  • Redskins’ second offensive drive…resulted in a first-quarter three-and-out…Ryan Grant seemed to slow up on his route on back-to-back Kirk shotgun incompletions.  The first one came on a second-and-six on which Vernon Davis was wide open but not thrown to.
  • Redskins’ seventh offensive drive…resulted in a third-quarter punt Vernon Davis slipped, allowing Eli Harold to blast Kirk on a second-and-nine under-center play-action incompletion intended for Jamison Crowder.

 

Running Game: D+

The Redskins were without Rob Kelley for the second time in three games, this time due to a sprained ankle.  Things did not go well.  Chris Thompson, Samaje Perine and Mack Brown combined for 27 carries for just 58 yards (2.15 yards per carry).

  • The Redskins’ ninth offensive drive, which resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ fourth-quarter 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead, happened despite some terrible runs…the drive began with a third-quarter first-and-10 Chris Thompson under-center-handoff run for no gain thanks in part to Jamison Crowder not picking up Jaquiski Tartt, who came in unblocked…Thompson also had a late-third-quarter first-and-10 under-center-handoff run for minus-one yard, a late-third-quarter second-and-10 shotgun-handoff run for minus-two yards and an early-fourth-quarter first-and-10 shotgun-handoff run for minus-one yard…but the worst play on this drive was Niles Paul (!) being gone to on a second-and-goal-at-the-2 offset-I handoff run for minus-one yard.  In fairness, though, to Paul and Jay Gruden, Jordan Reed’s bad blocking doomed this play.
  • Redskins’ third offensive drive…resulted in a first-quarter punt…Morgan Moses got blown up by Xavier Cooper on a Samaje Perine first-and-10 one-yard under-center-handoff run…Jordan Reed completely whiffed on Jaquiski Tartt on a Mack Brown third-and-one under-center-handoff run for minus-one yard.
  • The Redskins’ first offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s first-quarter second-and-five 11-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Josh Doctson, included a Chris Thompson fumble on a first-and-10 under-center-handoff run on the second offensive play of the game; the ball, thankfully, was recovered by Trent Williams…also on the drive: a Samaje Perine second-and-three two-yard under-center-handoff run.
  • Samaje Perine had a first-and-10 one-yard under-center-handoff run on the Redskins’ seventh offensive drive, which resulted in a third-quarter punt.
  • The Redskins’ fourth offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s second-quarter three-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Samaje Perine off read-option play-action, included a Chris Thompson first-and-10 under-center-toss run off jet-sweep action for minus-nine yards.

That run for a nine-yard loss did skew Thompson’s numbers (16 carries for 33 yards).  The Redskins’ sixth offensive drive, which resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ late-second-quarter 48-yard field goal for a 17-0 lead, began with a Thompson first-and-10 11-yard shotgun-handoff run.  The Redskins’ fourth offensive drive, which resulted in Kirk’s second-quarter three-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Samaje Perine off read-option play-action, included a Thompson first-and-five eight-yard under-center-handoff run and a Perine first-and-10 eight-yard under-center-handoff run on the first play of the second quarter.

Two of the Redskins’ best runs in this game were by non-running backs.  Kirk had a fourth-quarter first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead.  Jamison Crowder had a first-and-10 11-yard under-center-handoff run on a sweep on the game’s first offensive play, this on the drive that resulted in Kirk’s first-quarter second-and-five 11-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Josh Doctson.

 

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) heads toward the end zone for a touch down on a quarterback keeper as San Francisco 49ers defensive end Solomon Thomas (94) chases during the second half of an NFL football game in Landover, Md., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. The Redskins drafted the 49ers 26-24. (AP Photo/Mark Tenally)

 

Defense: C

Boy was this game bordering on disaster for the Redskins’ defense, which in fairness was without Josh Norman due to a rib fracture and then lost Jonathan Allen to a Lisfranc injury.  The 49ers entered Week 6 not just 0-5, but with just the no. 28 passing offense and no. 31 rushing offense in the NFL per the Football Outsiders DVOA metric.  And yet the Redskins allowed the 49ers to score 24 points over the final three quarters and have the ball at the Redskins’ 40 down by two with less than a minute left.  Everything seemed to be going the 49ers’ way, including ex-Redskin Pierre Garcon making a miracle third-and-four 12-yard reception while falling out of bounds at the Redskins’ 40 despite Quinton Dunbar deflecting the ball (the initial call of an incompletion was, correctly, reversed via replay).  But Garcon was called for a mega-costly second-and-10 10-yard pass-interference penalty that was absurd (not that I’m complaining) and moved the ball back to midfield.  And the Redskins’ defense stiffened, capped by Kendall Fuller making a game-sealing pick on a fourth-and-20 shotgun pass by C.J. Beathard with less than 10 seconds left.

The Redskins held the 49ers to just 6-for-17 on third downs, just 335 total net yards of offense and just 5.94 yards per pass attempt on 47 throws.  The Redskins had 10 quarterback hits, including three sacks.  The Redskins had nine pass defenses, including the huge Kendall Fuller game-sealing interception.

But things changed once Kyle Shanahan benched Brian Hoyer, who has been terrible this season, for rookie C.J. Beathard, the grandson of legendary former Redskins general manager Bobby Beathard.  The 49ers’ first five drives resulted in punts.  The first four of those drives were quarterbacked by Hoyer.  But things picked up once Beathard came into the game.  Among the disturbing moments:

  • Former Redskin Aldrick Robinson was wide open down the field thanks to a blown coverage by Fabian Moreau and Montae Nicholson missed on a tackle on C.J. Beathard’s first-and-10 45-yard shotgun touchdown bomb to Robinson with 1:58 left. Also on this drive was a Beathard third-and-eight 10-yard shotgun completion to Trent Taylor and a Beathard second-and-six 14-yard shotgun scramble on which Zach Brown just let up and allowed Beathard to scramble up the sideline for the first down and then out of bounds.
  • The 49ers’ sixth offensive drive…resulted in Carlos Hyde’s fourth-and-goal-at-the-1 I-formation-handoff touchdown run on the final offensive play of the first half… C.J. Beathard had a second-and-10 19-yard shotgun completion to Marquise Goodwin, a first-and-10 31-yard shotgun completion to George Kittle and a first-and-10 12-yard shotgun completion to Carlos Hyde on a screen…And D.J. Swearinger committed a foolish third-and-10 three-yard unsportsmanlike-conduct penalty, giving the 49ers a first-and-goal at the Redskins’ 2 off a Pierre Garcon third-and-10 eight-yard reception on which he collided with Montae Nicholson, knocking off his helmet.
  • The 49ers’ seventh offensive drive…resulted in Robbie Gould’s third-quarter 52-yard field goal that cut the Redskins’ lead to 17-10… C.J. Beathard had a third-and-eight 12-yard shotgun completion to Carlos Hyde and a first-and-10 11-yard shotgun completion to Matt Breida, who had a first-and-10 10-yard under-center-handoff run on the next play.
  • The 49ers’ eighth offensive drive, which resulted in Robbie Gould’s missed 47-yard field-goal attempt in the third quarter, included a Raheem Mostert third-and-one 16-yard under-center fake-dive toss run.

But, ultimately, the Redskins won this game.  And their defense was a big reason for that beyond just Kendall Fuller’s game-sealing pick.

  • 49ers’ eighth offensive drive…resulted in Robbie Gould’s missed 47-yard field-goal attempt in the third quarter…the play prior to that missed field-goal try was Matt Ioannidis sacking C.J. Beathard for an eight-yard loss on a third-and-five.
  • The 49ers’ 10th offensive drive…happened with the Redskins nursing a 20-17 fourth-quarter lead but resulted in a punt…Quinton Dunbar provided terrific coverage on a C.J. Beathard first-and-10 under-center play-action deep incompletion intended for Marquise Goodwin and on a Beathard third-and-four shotgun deep incompletion intended for Aldrick Robinson….also on the drive were Zach Brown and D.J. Swearinger tackling Carlos Hyde on a first-and-10 under-center-handoff run for minus-one yard.
  • 49ers’ third offensive drive…resulted in a first-quarter three-and-out…Quinton Dunbar delivered a big hit on Trent Taylor on a third-and-six reception for one yard.
  • 49ers’ second offensive drive…resulted in a first-quarter three-and-out…Matt Ioannidis and Preston Smith combined on a third-and-eight sack of Beathard for a 10-yard loss; the Redskins’ interior pressure on this play was a thing of beauty.
  • 49ers’ first offensive drive…resulted in a first-quarter punt…Zach Brown tackled Carlos Hyde on a first-and-10 under-center-handoff run for minus-two yards; Brown wasn’t at all fooled by jet-sweep action…the next play: Bashaud Breeland provided great coverage on Pierre Garcon on a C.J. Beathard second-and-12 under-center incompletion.
  • 49ers’ fourth offensive drive…resulted in a second-quarter punt…Fabian Moreau provided good coverage and Montae Nicholson displayed impressive closing speed on a Brian Hoyer second-and-10 under-center deep incompletion intended for Pierre Garcon…Quinton Dunbar undercut Garcon’s route on a Hoyer second-and-15 shotgun incompletion.
  • 49ers’ fifth offensive drive…resulted in a second-quarter punt…this was C.J. Beathard’s first drive of the game… D.J. Swearinger jumped the route and had a pass defense on a Beathard second-and-10 under-center incompletion intended for Aldrick Robinson.
  • 49ers’ seventh offensive drive…resulted in Robbie Gould’s third-quarter 52-yard field goal that cut the Redskins’ lead to 17-10…Preston Smith tackled Carlos Hyde on a second-and-five offset-I-toss run for minus-three yards…Matt Ioannidis and D.J. Swearinger tackled Matt Breida on a second-and-one under-center-handoff run for no gain…Ryan Kerrigan abused Daniel Kilgore on a first-and-10 sack of C.J. Beathard for an 11-yard loss…Kendall Fuller had a nice diving pass defense on a Beathard third-and-13 shotgun incompletion intended for Trent Taylor.

 

Special Teams: D+

A lot was made of Jay Gruden calling three straight runs on a late-fourth-quarter three-and-out in attempt to kill clock with the Redskins nursing a 26-24 lead as opposed to throwing to get a first down that would ice the game.  But what was most bothersome about that drive was how it ended: a Tress Way 45-yard punt from the 49ers’ 45 for a touchback.  That was terrible.  If you’re going to play that drive conservatively, you can’t have your punter boot a touchback.  And Way wasn’t exactly great on his other punts.  He had a first-quarter punts for just 43 and 42 yards to go with a third-quarter 51-yard punt.

The Redskins gave up a 39-yard return to Trent Taylor on that Tress Way third-quarter 51-yard punt.  The ensuing 49ers drive resulted in Robbie Gould’s missed 47-yard field-goal attempt in the third quarter.

Dustin Hopkins went 2-for-2 on field goals of 48 yards late in the second quarter and 21 yards early in the fourth quarter.  But he missed the extra-point attempt that followed Kirk’s fourth-quarter first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead.  We learned the day after the game that Hopkins was dealing with a right-hip rotator-muscle strain, and he was placed on injured reserve on Wednesday (Oct. 18).

Jamison Crowder had four fair catches and a six-yard return on punt returns.


Other Thoughts:

Jay Gruden botched a late-fourth-quarter three-and-out in an attempt to kill clock with the Redskins nursing a 26-24 lead as opposed to throwing to get a first down that would have iced the game.  He called three straight Samaje Perine runs that totaled a whopping six yards.  Jay’s desires to kill clock and have the 49ers burn their final two second-half timeouts were fine.  But he didn’t have to be so vanilla, especially given the struggles of the running game.  Why not have Kirk play-action boot on third down or even on second and third downs, and if nothing is available down the field for a first down he runs and slides or just falls down?  You could have had the best of both worlds that way.  Jay playing this drive so conservatively also wasn’t helped by Tress Way’s 45-yard punt for a touchback.  The 49ers ended up getting the ball at their 20 down by two with 52 seconds left.

I’m surprised at how many people believe that the Redskins got jobbed and/or that instant replay was wrong on the Vernon Davis lost fumble in the third quarter.  There was no conclusive video evidence of when his arm was down in relation to the state of the football.  The play likely would not have been reversed had it not been ruled a fumble, either.  That lost fumble stunk, but this wasn’t a case of the Redskins getting screwed or of replaying failing.  And in fact the Redskins benefited from bad officiating in two instances:

  • The late-fourth-quarter second-and-10 10-yard pass-interference penalty on Pierre Garcon on the drive that resulted in Kendall Fuller’s game-sealing pick was a joke of call.
  • The officials completely missed Jordan Reed false-starting prior to Kirk’s third-and-12 13-yard  shotgun checkdown completion to Chris Thompson on the first play of the fourth quarter on the drive that resulted in Dustin Hopkins’ 21-yard field goal that gave the Redskins a 20-17 lead.

One of the most interesting occurrences during this game was Kirk Cousins yelling at Terrelle Pryor Sr. for not lining up properly, disallowing the Redskins to quick snap after a third-quarter third-and-six three-yard shotgun completion to Jamison Crowder that initially was ruled a 17-yard completion but reversed up replay on a drive that resulted in a punt.  No way does Kirk do that to Pierre Garcon or DeSean Jackson last season.  Of course, you could argue that no day does either Pierre or DeSean make a mistake like that last season.

Playing-time observations:

  • Terrelle Pryor Sr. had just three receptions for 23 yards on five targets but led all Redskins receivers in snaps for a fifth straight game to begin the season (82 percent).
  • Jordan Reed played on 73 percent of the Redskins’ offensive snaps but had just four receptions for just 37 yards on five targets.  He did abuse Eric Reid on a second-quarter third-and-nine 14-yard reception on the drive that resulted in resulted in Kirk’s three-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Samaje Perine off read-option play-action.  But Reed is averaging just 7.9 yards per reception this season.  He wasn’t listed on any Redskins injury reports in the week leading up to this game, but it’s hard not to think that he’s still dealing with the rib and sternum injuries suffered in the Week 2 win at the Rams.
  • Jamison Crowder played on 72 percent of the Redskins’ offensive snaps but had just three receptions for 15 yards on five targets.  He’s averaging just 7.1 yards per reception
  • Josh Doctson had his first-quarter 11-yard touchdown reception, but that was his only catch on three targets.  And his playing time went down for a second straight game.  He played on just 26 percent of the Redskins’ offensive snaps in this game off playing on 34 percent in the Week 4 loss at Kansas City, 53 percent in the Week 3 win over Oakland, 41 percent in the Week 2 win at the Rams and 32 percent in the Week 1 loss to Philadelphia. For all of the talk about Doctson being more involved this season, he has been targeted just nine times over five games this season.
  • Brian Quick was active off having been inactive for the Week 4 loss at Kansas City, but he played on just four offensive snaps.
  • With Rob Kelley inactive due to a sprained ankle, Chris Thompson started and played on a season-high 61 percent of the Redskins’ offensive snaps.  I said after the Week 4 loss at Kansas City that Thompson needed to play more.  He did.  His previous play-time percentages this season working backwards: 52, 41, 41, 48.
  • Mack Brown was active for just the second time in five games this season but played on just four offensive snaps.  He had two carries for two yards but also an 11-yard reception.
  • Trent Williams was listed as questionable for this game due to a right-knee injury and yet played on 99 percent of the Redskins’ offensive snaps.
  • Zach Brown and Mason Foster were the only two Redskins who played on every defensive snap for the team.  Will Compton did not play on a single defensive snap for a third time in five games this season.  He has played on seven defensive snaps the entire season off being second on the Redskins in defensive snaps last season (85.25 percent).
  • Quinton Dunbar started in place of Josh Norman, who was inactive due to a rib fracture, and played on 89 percent of the Redskins’ defensive snaps.
  • Montae Nicholson was the Redskins’ starting strong safety for the third time in five games.  He played on 88 percent of the Redskins’ defensive snaps despite suffering a shoulder injury.
  • Matt Ioannidis, who had a sack and-half and four of the Redskins’ 10 quarterback hits, led all Redskins defensive ends in snaps for a third straight game at 57 percent.  The 2016 fifth-round pick out of Temple played on 12 more snaps than Jonathan Allen did (41 versus 29), though Allen did suffer a Lisfranc sprain.  Leading all Redskins defensive linemen in snaps for a second straight game was Ziggy Hood (60 percent).
  • Junior Galette played on just 33 percent of the Redskins’ defensive snaps.  His play-time percentages this season working backwards entering this game: 34, 29, 38, 23.

Have you noticed what the Redskins have been running a good bit of, perhaps more than in any season since 2013?  The read-option.  We are seeing a good bit of read-option looks and read-option plays so far this season.  Yes, the offense that a number of people incorrectly said was a one-year fad in 2012 remains alive and well, especially on teams like Houston with Deshaun Watson.  But regarding the Redskins this season, it’s not just a play like Kirk’s fourth-quarter first-and-goal seven-yard shotgun read-option touchdown run for a 26-17 lead in this game.  Or a play like Kirk’s second-quarter three-yard shotgun touchdown pass to Samaje Perine off read-option play-action in this game.  Or a play like Kirk’s third-quarter first-and-five nine-yard read-option run out of the shotgun in the Week 1 loss to Philadelphia.  We are seeing so many of the Redskins’ runs out of shotgun.  Just that formation itself presents the threat of read-option and the potential for the defense to have to account for an 11th man in the quarterback.

This loss made the 49ers the first team in NFL history to lose five consecutive games each by three or fewer points.

The 49ers’ captains for this game included former Redskins Pierre Garcon, Aldrick Robinson and Logan Paulsen.

The Redskins’ offense played this game without:

  • Running back Rob Kelley (inactive due to a sprained ankle suffered in the Week  4 loss at Kansas City on Monday Night Football)
  • Tackle Ty Nsekhe (inactive for a second straight game off undergoing core-muscle surgery due to an injury suffered in the Week 3 win over Oakland)
  • Tight end Jeremy Sprinkle (inactive)
  • Running back Keith Marshall (placed on injured reserve due to a torn right patellar tendon suffered in practice on July 29; the 2016 seventh-round pick out of Georgia spent all of last season on injured reserve due to an elbow injury suffered in the preseason)
  • Tackle Kevin Bowen (placed on injured reserve due to a labrum injury suffered during training camp)

Jonathan Allen suffered a Lisfranc sprain in this game and was placed on injured reserve on Thursday (Oct. 19).  This stinks.  Allen was having a very good rookie season, ranking second on the Redskins with 29 pressures /hurries per tape reviews by Redskins coaches (Matt Ioannidis is first with 43).  Additionally, Allen ranked 28th out of 124 interior defensive linemen with an overall grade of 81.3 per Pro Football Focus through Week 6.  And his pass-rush productivity of 12.0 ranked fifth among 107 interior linemen with at least 50 pass-rushing snaps per Pro Football Focus through Week 6.

Also, a number of Redskins defensive backs got hurt in this game: Bashaud Breeland (knee sprain), Montae Nicholson (shoulder), Fabian Moreau (hamstring), Stefan McClure (knee hyperextension).

The Redskins’ defense played this game without:

  • Corner Josh Norman (inactive due to a rib fracture suffered in the Week  4 loss at Kansas City on Monday Night Football)
  • Safety Deshazor Everett (inactive due to a hamstring injury suffered in the Week  4 loss at Kansas City on Monday Night Football)
  • Safety Su’a Cravens (placed on the reserve/left-squad list on Sept. 18; this off being placed on the exempt/left-squad list on Sept. 3 due to contemplating retirement; he also suffered a meniscus injury in the preseason-opening loss at Baltimore and underwent surgery on Aug. 15)
  • Linebacker Trent Murphy (placed on injured reserve on Aug. 12 due to a torn left ACL and MCL suffered in the preseason-opening loss at Baltimore)
  • Defensive lineman Phil Taylor Sr. (placed on injured reserve on Sept. 2 due to a torn left quadriceps tendon suffered in the preseason win over Cincinnati on Aug.27
  • Defensive back DeAngelo Hall (placed on the regular-season physically-unable-to-perform list on Sept. 2 off spending all of training camp and the preseason on the preseason PUP list due to a torn right ACL suffered in the Week 3 win at the Giants last season)
  • Defensive lineman Anthony Lanier II (inactive for a fifth straight game)
  • Linebacker Josh Harvey-Clemons (inactive for a fourth time in five games)

And there was a key special-teams injury for the Redskins coming out of this game: Dustin Hopkins had a right-hip rotator-muscle strain.  He was placed on injured reserve on Wednesday (Oct. 18), when the Redskins signed Nick Rose.  He is a 2016 undrafted free agent out of Texas who has never kicked in an NFL regular-season game.  Rose is known for having a very strong leg, but he went just 27-for-38 (71.1 percent) on field goals during his time with the Longhorns.

 

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